Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Seven values for California Association of the Deaf (CAD) to exist with


The barriage of negative comments from a very small intimate group of deaf people who are displeased with the current California Association of the Deaf (CAD) leadership continue to fill my inbox.

Putting the negative mudslinging way aside for the moment, I want to share you the seven values CAD should exist with.

1 ) INTEGRITY - Firm adherence to a code of moral values. Complete honesty, integrity, is almost tangible. Whenever you encounter it in deaf leaders, you know you can trust them. This ability to inspire trust and confidence is often a factor in a deaf organization's success.

2 ) COURAGE - Strength to do what is right regardless of consequences. Successful organizations require courage. Moments may come when courage alone will stand between organizations and disaster. There will be times when when we need dogged courage to keep our community going in hard times. We become what we think so we better pay attention to what we think.

3 ) ENTHUSIASM - Passion for continuity. There is the basic answer to the problem of keeping enthusiasm. You can not outlive enthusiasm. You can not achieve anything without enthusiasm.

4 ) HAPPINESS - State of well being and contentment. It is a favorite objective for the deaf community to be happy. Deaf leaders who are energetic, decisive, flexible, creative, and sociable create happy deaf communities. They tolerate frustration well and are willing to help others be happy.

5 ) CONFIDENCE - Belief and trust in self. Nothing is impossible for confident deaf leaders. The secret is to think eccentric to get big results. Confidence is available to everyone regardless of who, what, and where they are.

6 ) HOPE - Expectation of success. Deaf organizations are always fraught with confusion. Difficulties will always descend upon our community and if we have hope, it will pass. Deaf organizations that continue on, are the ones that have hope.

7 ) DEVOTION - Selfless concern for everyone. Reducing disappointment among members will make a deaf leader victorious. Devoted deaf leaders see the best in everyone. They also stay away from character assassinations. And they do not show disappointment in people that do not demonstrate devotion.

The next few days will play out the true colors of CAD and we all hope for the best that we elect to continue the traditions that has kept CAD alive, thriving, and strong.

Richard Roehm